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Rock climbing; New guide promises to help locals

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Dana Ludington repels down a crag at a route in the Bucks Lake Wilderness. A new guidebook on rock climbing, due to be released this summer, will make it easier for climbers to find routes. Photo by James Wilson
James Wilson

  A new guidebook for rock climbing authored by local climbers is due to be released this summer. The book, “Locals Guide to: Rock Climbs of Northeast California,” details climbs throughout Plumas, Lassen, Tehama and parts of Butte and Shasta counties.

  Paul Bernard, of Chester, has worked for several years on the book that will soon be a reality. Sections of the book were put together by Brett Marty, Saylor Flett and Mason Werner, all of Quincy, as well.

  “The main reason we compiled this is to preserve the historical aspect of these climbing areas,” said Bernard. “A lot of the climbers who established these routes back in the ‘70s are dying off, and we need to record where these are.”

  The book will be the first comprehensive guide to crags around the area. Formerly, climbers would have to get the inside scoop from one another to know where to climb. The guide will have detailed maps, descriptions and full-color photos to help climbers find their way.

  “It’s really been fun to share our passion in this book,” said Marty. “It will cater to environmentally friendly outdoor recreationalists.”

  The guide, and all the climbs, were developed with strict ground-up ethics, and the authors used a minimum number of bolts.

  Many of the climbs mentioned in the book were discovered by the authors themselves. Once a climb was first ascended, it was named by whoever reached the top first.

  The authors also added bits of local flavor to the guidebook. One example is in the section covering the Bucks Lake Wilderness. The authors suggest trying a Tree Smacker cocktail at one of the restaurants up at Bucks.

  The guidebook is the second in a series of eight “Locals Guide” books that will cover the crags and routes from north of Yosemite up to the Oregon border.

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